Dellenbach was healthy, and fit, and now needs a double lung transplant, as a result of COVID-19

by Kevin Cody

Over the Christmas holidays, Eric Dellenbach, his wife Erika and twin 7-year-olds Jaxson, and Mia contracted COVID-19. The cases were mild, except Eric’s. He went to an emergency room near his home in Seattle  But because he didn’t fit the high risk profile, he returned home. He was just 51 and healthy from a lifetime of surfing and snowboarding. 

Dellenbach grew up on Duncan Place in Manhattan Beach. He attended Robinson School, Center Middle School and Mira Costa. Upon graduation he attended San Diego State and then met his wife Erika. After a few years he moved his family to the Seattle area for a job in hospital administration.

The day after he went to the emergency room, his condition deteriorated and he was rushed by ambulance to a hospital. But again, everyone assumed because of his youth and good health, that he would quickly recover. Instead, he developed Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), from the fluid build up in the lungs.

The COVID passed, but the damage to his lungs required intubation. Six weeks ago he was put into an induced coma. 

His physicians believe his lungs are so severely damaged that he will need a double lung transplant to continue living. 

His family, including his brother Andy Dellenbach, who lives in Redondo Beach, and is CEO of the Jimmy Miller Memorial Foundation, are hoping to find a surgeon and medical center able to perform a double lung transplant.

More information is available at GoFundMe.com/f/support-the-eric-dellenbach-family. ER

 

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Written by: Kevin Cody

Kevin is the publisher of Easy Reader and Beach. Share your news tips. 310 372-4611 ext. 110 or kevin[at]easyreadernews[dot]com

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