Judy Rae

Letters to the Editor 3-8-18

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Last view standing

Dear ER:

They finally came for me. Yes, I lost my view of downtown L.A. and the mountains. I also feel like I can reach out and hold hands with my neighbor. This is in an already crowded Golden Hills. The mezzanine? I think this is a loophole that lets people have a third story. Hopefully as more people become aware of this then it might stop.                                                                                             Michael Pavlow

Redondo Beach

 

Killer idea

Dear ER:

Anyone who has ever had to sit through a faculty meeting — or worse, some kind of “improving teaching” workshop — would never want to arm teachers.

Gary Hartzell

Manhattan Beach

 

License to race

Dear ER:

I can only shake my head when I read of the Hermosa City Council’s desire to add a wheelchair-and-stroller-accessible path to the Greenbelt (“Rough road for Greenbelt path proposal”). Doesn’t anyone see that if we build a pathway of hard-packed material described by the city manager as “comparable to concrete,” it will simply become a high speed bike lane?  What would prevent it – a “No Bikes” sign that would be just as ignored and just as unenforced as the “walk zone” on The Strand? Before we spend a bucket of our tax money on this, we’d better give some thought to what it is we want and what we’d actually be getting.

Denny Nivens

Hermosa Beach

 

Faults of our fathers

Dear ER:

Affluent school districts like Beverly Hills and Palo Alto were grandfathered in for higher school funding (“On the brink: How Manhattan Beach Unified became among the lowest funded school districts in the U.S.,” ER Mar. 1, 2018). Why wasn’t Manhattan Beach? The District has poorly managed the proceeds from several large bond issues in the past. Is this another example of the District not getting it right?

Dan Stern

Manhattan Beach

 

Sustainable government

Dear ER:

I read the plight of the underfunded Manhattan Beach School District (“On the brink: How Manhattan Beach Unified became among the lowest funded school districts in the U.S.,” ER Mar. 1, 2018). As a Hermosa resident, our district is under the same financial pressures. Any new facilities or major improvements have to be funded through bond measures. Enrichment offerings have to be funded through foundations and donations. Classes are horribly overcrowded. What is the solution to this dire situation in Manhattan Beach (and likely to be proposed in Hermosa)? A parcel tax (yes, more taxes). This is on top of the bonds, fees, levies, ever increasing state, county and local sales taxes and our now, non-deductible, state income tax.

We blame this on Prop 13 but we are taxed in so many different ways. We have voted for massive bond measures for education, which receive little if any matching State or Federal dollars. In Hermosa we pay a 6 percent Utility Fee that goes right into the General Fund and a new Sewer Fee for repairs the city neglected for decades. All assessed at the local level. This doesn’t include income taxes increases or “temporary” sales tax increases that never seem to be temporary. When are we ever going to stop looking at “another tax” as the answer but instead hold our Federal, State and Local officials responsible for providing better service for the dollars we already provide (44th in the nation in education, yet the world’s 6th largest economy). For communities so concerned about sustainability, we certainly don’t seem to care about responsible, sustainable levels of government spending. Why should we when we can just add another parcel tax?

Tom Lewis

Hermosa Beach

 

Sports vs scholarship

Dear ER:

The tax structure has changed dramatically since the December poll that was conducted about a Manhattan Beach parcel tax by TBWB Strategies. I don’t think Manhattan Beach property owners (independent of age) will accept an increase to their property tax to supplement the school system. California state tax is one of the highest in the nation, and with the recent change to the federal tax code, we can no longer deduct state tax from our personal income tax. It’s a very bad time to propose another tax. Having said this, I personally think that it is important to subsidize our local school system. But I have to ask the question why the MBSD spend a few million dollars improving the athletic program instead of appropriating at least some of the funding for academics? Didn’t they see this coming? As a property owner in MB, I would have no issue making a tax deductible contribution to the educational foundation as I have done many times in the past. But under no circumstances would I vote YES on a parcel tax.

April Marano-Ford

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One day

Dear ER:

I attended this meeting with my wife Anita Solomon and as Jews who were alive safely in the US we were transfixed (“Redondo Union welcomes Holocaust survivor,” ER Mar. 1, 2018). I loved that we were with so many locals, both young and old. Since the “Shoah” there have been other killings, in Africa for example. At some point in time we will realize everyone is valuable no matter the color or national origin.

Barry Solomon

Redondo Beach

 

Faint praise

Dear ER:

Well, I hate to admit it, but Hermosa Beach Mayor Justin Massey finally did something right by just saying no (“Rough road for Greenbelt path proposal,” ER March 3, 2018). Even a blind squirrel finds an acorn once in a while. Thanks to Massey for getting something right and he had Councilman Hany Fangary fall right in line with him. I’ll bet that will cause him some problems with his far left green socialist dream team. Just say no to feel good pet projects.

Kent Allen

Hermosa Beach

 

Schmeltzer smelted Redondo

Dear ER:

Marna Smeltzer has been a huge benefactor to our community and has worked her heart and soul into her mission to help build a strong local economy. She is a true friend to the business community and the residents. Working with her has changed my life in ways I can not even measure. She will be very hard to replace. She has endured the slings and arrows of injustice and weathered the storms with grace and dignity.

Steve Goldstein

Redondo Beach

 

Schmeltzer legacy

Dear ER:

Marna Smeltzer is leaving our community a wonderful legacy: a vibrant and successful local business community. Why does this matter? Because a successful and vibrant local business community not only provides all of us with the business and leisure services we want and need in our everyday lives; but also provides desperately needed revenues our City coffers need to provide the quality of life we all enjoy in Redondo Beach. Services like police, fire, street repairs, parks, clean beaches — just to name a few. Through Schmeltzer’s years of selfless service to our community, all of our lives have been greatly enriched.

Ann Garten

Redondo Beach

 

Money where it matters

Dear ER:

As a senior who lived at Seasons Senior Apartments for over seven years I was very disappointed to learn that Beach Cities Health District plans still call for 400 units of combined assisted and independent living units on its 11-acre campus “revitalization.” If BCHD wants to keep seniors in their homes the solution is not more brick and mortar but more in-home services. Nurses at Seasons, Heritage and Casa de los Amigos senior homes could help avoid the price of having four paramedics arrive in an expensive ambulance for a ride to the emergency room for a sprained ankle, a slight spike in blood pressure or heart rate, or many other small problems a nurse could deal with, and which could easily be paid for from the savings. Spending more on assisting seniors with substance abuse problems or post-surgery issues would also help keep us in our homes. I’m sure I’ll hear from BCHD officials saying they already spend a lot, but they need to do more. As we baby boomers age we all need to think about new solutions “outside the box.” Otherwise we’re just going to get more senior housing that few here can afford.

Ross Yosnow

Redondo Beach

 

Educated choice

Dear ER:

When I first heard Framroze “Fram” Virjee speak at the AOA conference two years ago in his role as CSU General Counsel, I remarked to anyone who would listen that here was an attorney who was a refreshing change from the norm — one who cared — and gave the clear impression that “listening” was a significant component to any success he might achieve (“Palos Verdes to Rwanda to Fullerton,” EasyReaderNews.com). The background provided in this article is both refreshing and reassuring. He will truly make a difference at Cal State University Fullerton as he does wherever he directs his energies.

Bill Dickerson

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