Surfboard with broken leash prompts crowd to call lifeguards

Los Angeles County Lifeguard Natalie Anzavino enters the water to rescue a surfer whose leash broke. Photo by Bill Hood

Los Angeles County Lifeguard Chris Maloney assists the surfer, who bodysurfed back to the beach. Photo by Bill Hood

The surfboard with the broken leash that prompted people on the beach to flag down a passing lifeguard truck. Photo by Bill Hood

A surfboard that washed ashore with a broken leash in El Porto late Sunday afternoon prompted a concerned crowd watching the 10- to 20-foot surf to flag down a Los Angeles County Lifeguard truck.

“The lifeguard truck just happened to be passing by. I had watched the driver close up his tower in front of the El Segundo jetty just minutes before,” said Bill Hood, who was returning home from a sunset bike ride. 

“Everyone was looking for the surfer out in the huge swells, and when we spotted him we pointed him out to the lifeguard, who was searching through his binocs,” Hood said.

Lifeguards Natalie Anzavino and Chris Maloney arrived in another truck and swam out to rescue the surfer. But before they could reach him, he bodysurfed back to the beach. 

Hood said that after the incident, he talked to the surfer, who had been in danger of hypothermia from the mid-50 degree water.

“He said he was starting to get worried, until he saw the lifeguard trucks with their flashing lights. That gave him the surge of adrenaline he needed to swim in. He also said it was a beautiful sunset,” Hood said.

“After Maloney helped the surfer out of the water everyone applauded,” Hood said. ER

 

Comments:

comments so far. Comments posted to EasyReaderNews.com may be reprinted in the Easy Reader print edition, which is published each Thursday.

Written by: Easy Reader Staff

Be an Easy Reader Free Press supporter!

Yes, we know Easy Reader and EasyReaderNews.com are free. But they are not free to produce. The advertiser model that traditionally supported newspapers is fading away. This is our way of transitioning to a future where newspapers are supported by their readers. Which is as it should be. We hope you’ll support us. — Kevin Cody, Publisher